What Does A Mayor Do?

I had a group of kids visit me at City Hall a few weeks ago – home learners taking a Civics 101 class. About 20 of them sat down around a table with me, and peppered me with questions. The first question they asked, “What does a mayor do?” I’ve been asked this question a lot since taking office and from a wide variety of people.

What does a mayor do? And what is this mayor going to do?

The roles and responsibilities of the mayor are very clearly outlined in the Community Charter, which is the provincial legislation through which municipalities get their power. Bear with me and check out the relevant section of the Community Charter. Then – before your eyes glaze over from legal speak ­­– I’ll tell you what I think is most important and what I’d like to focus on as your mayor for the next four years.

Responsibilities of Mayor
116 (1) The mayor is the head and chief executive officer of the municipality.

(2) In addition to the mayor’s responsibilities as a member of council, the mayor has the following responsibilities:

(a) to provide leadership to the council, including by recommending bylaws, resolutions and other measures that, in the mayor’s opinion, may assist the peace, order and good government of the municipality;

(b) to communicate information to the council;

(c) to preside at council meetings when in attendance;

(d) to provide, on behalf of the council, general direction to municipal officers respecting implementation of municipal policies, programs and other directions of the council;

(e) to establish standing committees in accordance with section 141;

(f) to suspend municipal officers and employees in accordance with section 151;

(g) to reflect the will of council and to carry out other duties on behalf of the council;

(h) to carry out other duties assigned under this or any other Act.

Leadership. Communication. Direction.
These are the words that resonate. Let’s focus on leadership. To me, providing leadership to the Council doesn’t just mean chairing meetings, representing the Council at public events, or being the spokesperson on Council decisions. These things are easy to do.

Providing leadership, to me, means being a proactive, forward-looking, big-picture mayor, focused on the strategic direction of the City in the short, medium and long term. It means being willing to bring forward and recommend resolutions that are bold and that take ‘good government’ in a 21st century direction of openness, meaningful public participation, and new modes of collaboration, to name a few.

Being this kind of mayor requires focus, discipline and time.

Rigid Discipline and Ruthless Focus
When I was a PhD. student, responsible only to myself and my dissertation committee, I was rigidly disciplined and ruthlessly focused. Over the past five years starting and running Community Micro Lending and working hard as a City Councilor I lost much of that discipline and focus.

It’s easy to open my email inbox, respond to all the new emails and feel like I’m getting lots done. Or to engage in a lengthy Twitter or Facebook conversation, or have seven back-to-back one-on-one meetings and feel like I’m moving things forward. To be an effective mayor I need to find a strong balance between immediate demands and strategic focus.

So, I spent the December holiday planning how to bring discipline and focus with me to the position of mayor. What principles can I apply to help shape the bulk of my time before I answer emails, respond to tweets, settle in at a coffee shop for a one-on-one?

As the Community Charter says, “The mayor is the head and chief executive officer of the municipality.” In the private sector, a CEO’s job is to set the strategy and vision and oversee implementation, create a positive organizational culture, build a strong team, and allocate capital.

What MUST I do?
Each morning I ask myself, “What MUST I do today to focus on strategy, vision, organizational culture, team building and financial oversight at the City of Victoria?” And then, I make a list. Right now most of the list items are focused on strategic planning, building relationships with other community leaders, working hard with the Council and staff to create a positive organizational culture and build a strong team. If I lose my way during the day, find myself lost in the world of email or twitter, responding to immediate needs, I return to my MUST list. It’s become a touchstone and a guide.

You’ll still find me answering emails, responding to tweets, and meeting one-on-one, most often at HabitSolstice or 2 Per Cent Jazz. But hopefully only after my “What MUST I do today?” list has satisfying check marks beside every item.

Inaugural Address

Here is the video and text of my inaugural address to the citizens and council of Victoria:

“I would like to recognize the four MLA’s in attendance: Maureen Karagianis, Dr. Andrew Weaver, Rob Fleming and Carole James. Thank you for taking the time out of your busy schedules to bear witness to this very important moment in our City.

I would like to begin by celebrating that we are the Capital City of British Columbia and, as many of our Councillors have said over the past few weeks of getting to know each other, we’d like to make this Capital City shine.
I also want to begin by acknowledging the hard work of Mayor Fortin and the previous Council; a lot of good work was done here in these Chambers and out in the community in the last three years. It is a really, really great foundation for us to build on, I am deeply grateful for that work.

Elder Mary Ann Thomas and I were together at an open house for Dockside Green in the summertime and she began by addressing the crowd. I then spoke to the group after her. Mary Ann’s first words to the crowd were: “I love you, I care about you, and I respect you” . When I got up to speak I said, “What if as elected officials this is how we address the public in significant moments? So in this Inaugural Address I would like to begin by saying “I love you, I care about you, and I respect you.”

“For me, this really sets the tone for our relationship for the next four years. We won’t always agree, and I welcome that, but with a basis of love, care and respect we can begin to change the tone of us and them, to us, all of us, in this Chamber and far beyond, working to build the City together.

This deep respect and desire to work together differently leads into the core of my remarks that I would like to make this morning.
I just want to tell you a little bit about how this speech was crafted. Your Council has already been hard at work in orientation sessions for the last few weeks, learning the ropes, learning about what all the departments are working on, having tours and even going out on the fire boat. We are going to post everything we learned on the City’s website so you can learn it too. At the end of the day yesterday, I asked the Council, “I’ve got some time tomorrow in my opening remarks, what would you like me to say?” so the core of the speech is really by all nine of us. 
I would like to talk about three things that the Council brought to my attention yesterday. The first is meaningful public participation, the second is collaboration, and the third is affordability and prosperity.
Meaningful public participation.

An underlining value of this Council is openness and ongoing opportunities for you to participate. We want to continue to transform this relationship between City Hall and the community, so, as I said earlier, we are all part of the us. This means that we are going to be asking for your input early on large projects, and sewage treatment comes to mind. 
It means that we are going to work with you on a regular basis on neighbourhood transportation planning, placemaking, fostering and supporting initiatives that come to us from our small business community; fostering and supporting resident-led citizen driven initiatives. All of us up here know that you have the wisdom that we need to run the City.

Third, and this is really important, we are going to reach beyond those who regularly engage, we saw a 41% increase in voter turnout in the last election, that is more than 7,000 people coming out to vote who haven’t voted before, or haven’t voted in a while. And our job, the job of the nine of us up here, is to keep those 7,000 people, and all of you, engaged; and not just every four years, but throughout the next four years. It is really important to us to make sure that we are reaching beyond, extending our hands and using techniques that work for the younger generation and for people who don’t normally come into this hall. Our job is to go out and extend the reach of this local government and invite more people in.

Collaboration

Second, collaboration, or as Elder Mary Ann Thomas said, “walking together.” I think is a little bit of a new era in the region, and it already feels a little bit different. There is already talk among municipalities on how can we work together on economic development, housing, transportation and policing. Nils Jensen has called the proposal to get all the mayors together, Mayors without Borders. He said, Lisa, “Will you credit me?” and I said, “Nils, absolutely I will.” 

In addition to informal collaboration, working together and walking together, the public has spoken very clearly on the question of amalgamation. So, we need to do two things in this regard. We need to continue to make room for people to be part of the conversation. And, there is movement afoot to create something called “The Greater Greatest Victoria Conversation Project. look forward to hearing more about that. And, we need to work together across the region to explore options for, and studies about, amalgamation. And, I am really optimistic that we can cooperate on better cooperation!

Third piece of collaboration is our relationship with our provincial and federal governments. I think we need to reset our relationship with the provincial government. The first call I made on the Monday morning after being elected, was to the Premier’s Office to extend a hand and invite that conversation to begin. And, I think all of us up here, look forward to working with the Premier, and her Ministers and with all of our MLA’s to say “What is it that you want to accomplish in our region in the next few years and how can we support you in your work?”

The fourth point of closer collaboration, walking together, is with the Songhees and Esquimalt Nations. Mayor Lowe started a close protocol relationship. The Songhees and Esquimalt Nations are on fire right now in many, many ways, particularly with regard to economic development and we need to support, partner and collaborate with them as they continue on their journey.
And finally, on collaboration, and this was raised by many of the Councillors around the table when I asked yesterday, the collaboration between Council and staff. If we can do that well, we can do anything. We have amazing, amazing staff at the City of Victoria and it has been my honour for the last three years as a Councillor to work with them, and, to me, this is where everything begins. If we can get the relationship between staff and Council right, respectful, and if we all do what we are supposed to do and stay out of each other’s ways when we are not supposed to be there, role clarity, keeping governance governance and operations operations, I think we are off to great places. I had the pleasure of speaking briefly at our Quarterly Staff Forum, and what I said to staff was: “You are creative and innovative and we are going to continually look to you for your solutions and for your ideas. We are going to stay out our your way, so that you can do your job. And, most importantly, we have your back.”

Finally, affordability and prosperity. One of the first letters that I received in my mailbox after being elected, and it said the following:

“Hello Lisa, Please be sure that property taxes don’t increase, decrease would be better. I’m still paying with post-dated cheques for the last property tax. I am 83 years old and I find it very, very hard.”

So, our job as Council is to take this letter and the many other letters we’ve received very seriously. We need to continue to work on affordable housing absolutely, but we need to broaden the conversation about what affordability means and for who. We need to keep working to deliver public services, and for all our workers out there, I emphasize the word public, how we can deliver public services in a more effective way.

And, again, I look to, and I ask our staff, to look to the workers for their creative and innovative ideas on the front lines to find cost-savings; they have those ideas because I hear them all the time informally. So we need to look to our workers to make the services we deliver more affordable. And we need to break down silos in the organization and embrace our new City Manager’s (and I guess I can call him that until he has been here for a year in February) One City approach where everybody understands the work of everybody else. That is good for morale, but it is also good for effective and cost effective delivery of services. I really look forward to seeing us working so this 83 year old woman and the 25 year olds and everybody in this City can have and affordable life.

The second piece or the second-and-a-half piece of affordability is economic development. We need to create local prosperity and grow the economy. We are going to get our four-year strategic plan in place by the end of February and I look forward to that process. For me, a key priority in this plan, and the legacy that I’d like to see this Council leave, is that Victoria becomes a place where there is always an opportunity for everyone to prosper; where City Hall is a partner in the creation of local wealth and prosperity and this means, and this is really important, to me, it’s not community versus business, it is community and business, together. Two different sides of the same coin.
My final word is to my Council. When we were elected three years ago, those of us who were here were told: say good-bye to your families you are not going to see them for the next three years. And, what I say to you is take the time you need with your families to be loved, and nurtured and held, because it’s that kind of love and nurturing and holding that will allow all of us to do a good job together.

That was my final word to my Council, but I have one final word for all of you. This comes from our Director of Planning, Deb Day, who is retiring tomorrow. Deb said to me: Lisa, you and the Council have an enormous responsibility when you think about planning and when you think about the City. Of course you are here to serve, listen to work hard for all of the people who are alive and here today. But your higher purpose, your longer term goal is to make decisions for people who aren’t even born yet. And that is a hard thing to do, to cast our views thirty to forty years down the road. So I challenge us all, and I challenge you all to help us in the next four years to take a broad and long-term approach to every decision that we make together.

Thank you very much, and it is truly my honour to be your Mayor.”

Open Letter to Victorians

Last Saturday night I was elected Mayor of Victoria. It didn’t take long to sink in. And, as the Times Colonist reported, I was already hard at work first thing Monday morning.

What has taken longer is for me to sit down and write this letter to you all, reflecting on the state of politics in our city and on how we won the election.

First, I want to thank everyone who came out to vote on November 15th. Whether you voted Helps or someone else, Victoria’s voter turnout increased by 41% over 2011. This means that over 7000 more people made their way to their local polling station to cast a vote. This is good for democracy.  Thanks for voting. And thanks for electing me as your mayor. It’s my honour and I look forward to building this city, with you, for the next four years.

What’s taken me a week to recover from is how we do politics, even at the local level. In the final days of the campaign there was an orchestrated attempt on social media to call my integrity into question. What strikes me are two things. First, how, even people who I consider colleagues and supporters seemed poised, sitting there and waiting to hit the ‘share’ button. Second, social media can be a powerful force for spreading positive messages and it can also be a dangerous force where people share and post stuff they’d never say if they were standing there looking you in the eye.  

So what? Get over it? You won! One of the things I’ll be thinking about for a long time is this: How can we have good government when the way we get there is so nasty? And how do we rebuild community after we are so divided from each other on the campaign trail?

Whether you voted for me, or not, whether you campaigned with me, or against me, I am your mayor and I’m committed to working with you. But in some cases, we’ve got some repair work to do. I think it’s healthy for politics and for community building to talk through the messiness of the campaign, to name the things that are usually left unsaid, and to come out the other side stronger. I look forward to these conversations.

So, how did we win the election? More powerful than the endorsement of one MP and two MLAs, more powerful than thousands of dollars of attack ads, more powerful than last minute ditch efforts to dig up dirt and smear my name (“Lisa Helps herself” traveled quickly through the social media sphere), more powerful than all of this, is people.

I attribute my win to the hard and dedicated work of Team Helps, which was over 200 strong by the end. But it was more than this. It was you. It was 9200 of you, many of you first-time voters who saw in me someone that would listen to you, someone who would stand beside you, someone who had a bit of a fresh perspective, an eye to the future, and an ear to the ground. It was people that helped me win this election, and it’s people that will help me run this city for the next four years.  

Stay connected here as we transition this website from campaign mode to mayor mode. Check back regularly and please keep those ideas, thoughts, concerns and aspirations coming my way to lisa@lisahelpsvictoria.ca or call me or text me at 250-661-2708.

Whole Hearted Politics

On Saturday morning I was honoured to participate with Barb Desjardins and Cairine Green in a women and politics panel at Weaving Connections: Leadership, Creativity & Social Change, organized by the friends of St. Ann’s Academy. The panel was a welcome reprieve from the campaign trail and an opportunity for sharing ideas and experiences about the challenges and opportunities of being women in leadership positions.

With one week left to go in a very heated campaign for City of Victoria mayor, I chose to focus my talk on whole-hearted politics. While spoken talks don’t always translate well into the written word, I think the remarks are well worth sharing for the many of us interested in transforming politics from a blood sport to a collaborative whole-hearted practice. Local politics is an ideal place to start this transformation.

Competition and Collaboration
If the 20th century was the century of competition, the 21st century is the century of collaboration.  The 20th century saw many large-scale wars. It saw the rise of mass consumerism, with companies competing viciously with each other for your every dollar. It saw the race to extract natural resources as quickly and ‘cheaply’ as possible without considering the consequences. And, in the latter years of the 20th century, the globalization of everything ramped up this spirit of competition far beyond national borders.

The 21st century is already shaping up to be different. It’s the century of collaboration. We see this in the private sector where the companies that are great places to work, are also the most profitable – they share data, resources and ideas with their competitors, raising the bar for everyone. We see this in the non-profit sector with organizations co-locating, sharing resources, working together to serve their communities. We see this globally and locally with people developing local solutions to climate change, poverty prevention, economic development, to name a few, and sharing these solutions globally.

But we don’t yet see this collaborative spirit in politics. There are many reasons that politics remains entirely competitive, separating elected officials from each other and from the people we are elected to represent.

First, at higher levels of government, party politics and the system of government creates a climate where people are expected to serve their party first and the people second. The very nature of the words ‘government versus opposition’ prevent collaboration. Rather than focusing on shared goals to improve the lives of residents and opportunities for business, the government and its opposition most often level spirited attacks against each other, pointing out flaws and weaknesses.

Second, the media pits elected officials against each other, and sometimes we get drawn in. At yesterday’s panel, during the audience discussion, a journalism student stood up and said she’d been taught that competition, conflict and controversy are what sells. This happens especially at election time.

Third, the very nature of elections and the electoral process is adversarial. Those of us trying to get elected need to spend months in self-promotion mode, telling everyone who will listen why we are ‘better’ than everyone else running and why our competitors are ‘worse.’ We must separate ourselves from each other. We must try to stand above each other.

Humanness and Vulnerability
As people running for, or elected to, public office we can begin to change this. We can bring our vulnerability, our humanness, deep understanding, compassion and even love and open-heartedness from outside the political arena smack dab into the centre of it.

We can understand that all of us running for office are fully human and therefore vulnerable. When attacks are leveled against us on the campaign trail we can look with compassion and deep understanding at those leveling the attacks. We can understand that the attacks come from a place of them too feeling vulnerable and exposed.

After we’re elected to public office, we can continually look for points of connection between ourselves and others. We don’t need to ‘put our differences aside’; we need to use our differences, to greet diversity and difference of opinion with curiosity, generosity and compassion. Coming together across difference is what creates stronger more resilient decisions.

Whole Hearted Politics
Finally, both when running for office and once elected, we need to remain open-hearted. Stop reading for a moment and clench your fist really tightly, as tight as you can. Then, let your hand fully relax. What feels better?

I’ve felt my heart slam shut a few times in the past week, especially after the Fernwood mayor’s debate where attacks were leveled against me for the first time. And that’s taken a lot of energy, feeling defensive, clenching my heart shut so that all those comments can bounce off.

There is strength in whole-hearted and loving politics. When our hearts remain open, any negative comments that come our way can filter through and wash away. When we do this on the campaign trail, and once elected, it can clear away our defensiveness and ready us for clear-headed decision making. Surely this clear-headedness is what we want of all of our elected officials.

My final words to the crowd gathered at St. Ann’s Academy on Saturday morning. “My project for the next week? To love Ida Chong, Dean Fortin, and Stephen Andrew with an open heart.”

Setting the Record Straight

I’m learning a lot about politics in my run to be your mayor. The mayor’s debates have been particularly interesting. I think if someone did an analysis of the amount of airtime the candidates spend looking backwards at what has or hasn’t been done, and pointing fingers, we’d see that a lot of the time is spent on this.

I’ve been trying to keep my spirits up and to stay focused, looking forward, on the future of Victoria, and on the city that we will create, together if I’m elected on November 15th. I relish the opportunity to serve as your mayor and I feel really excited about the energy I sense in the community about change and possibility and a new way of doing politics.

There has been some misinformation, so I want to set the record straight and share my perspective on a few issues that are really important to me, and to you as well.

Crystal Pool
The word on the street is that I plan to privatize Crystal Pool. I don’t. On October 13th2013, the day Council was asked to vote on whether we want to have a publicly owned and operated swimming pool or not, I published this blog post. In it I said, “I support the retention of a public pool and fitness centre in Victoria. And, to be perfectly clear, I support this facility being operated by the City and staffed by our terrific, competent and very capable workers.”

I also said, should the City decide to rebuild rather than refurbish the pool, that we keep our options open as to how we get to a publicly run swimming pool. My commitment to Victorians in my detailed election platform is to develop a business case for a Crystal Pool and Wellness Centre that incorporates a publicly owned and operated swimming pool and recreation centre as well as commercial / retail space and housing. This may require a partnership with the non-profit or private sector for the housing portion and for the commercial space (for doctor’s office, massage therapist, chiropractor etc).

When I was asked to vote on the issue at the Council table, it was framed as a black and white choice. In order to keep the City’s options open, to innovate, and to look for creative solutions, I was forced to vote “no”.  There was no outside the box option available. The spirit of leadership that I bring to the table is to look for a common goal – a publicly owned and operated swimming pool – and a willingness to find new and creative ways to get there.

City of Victoria Housing Trust Fund
Early in our term of Council we were considering the contribution that the City makes to the City and the Regional Affordable Housing Trust Funds. Every year the City puts $500,000 into these trust funds. Early in my term, Council was considering reducing this to $400,000 per year for the next three years.

We were making this decision in October 2012. From July to October 2012, I had undertaken budget workshops across the City to ask Victoria residents and business owners for their input on the 2013-2015 budget. The number one concern I heard from seniors was that Victoria is getting too expensive. While Council may have capped the property tax increase, their pensions weren’t going to increase that much every year.

The voices and concerns of the seniors were on my mind when I voted, at Governance and Priorities Committee in favour of reducing the City’s contribution to affordable housing to $400,000 per year.

But then, in the two weeks between the committee decision and the Council decision (which is where we make final policy decisions) I learned something important. I learned that each $10,000 the City contributes to new affordable housing projects, leverages $1.4 million in contributions for other funders. So in voting to cut $100,000 I’d actually be cutting $14 million in potential funding. With this new information in hand, I voted in favour of keeping the City’s contribution at $500,000 per year. As a leader I’m willing to change course when I get new information and evidence.

In my platform I commit, in year three of our term, to see if there is money in the budget to increase the amount we put into the affordable housing trust funds.

Tax Exemptions for Non-Profits
In this past term, Council reviewed its non-profit tax exemption policy. In so doing, we found something troubling. In 2006, Council had changed its tax exemption program so that new applicants to the program were granted only a 50% property tax exemption. At the same time, Council grandfathered a 100% permissive property tax exemption for all organizations that already received a tax exemption.

Frankly put, organizations that had received a tax exemption before 2006 received a 100% exemption. Organizations which had applied after 2006 received only a 50% exemption. This is unfair and it is an unequal application of policy.

Council wanted to make sure that City policy is applied fairly to all the amazing organizations that do important charitable and community service work in the community. And I also understand the challenges facing this sector, having worked in it for many years. So we voted to phase in a 50% exemption for everyone over a 10-year period to give the organizations receiving a 100% exemption time to adapt to the new policy gradually.

Thank you
Thanks for taking the time to read this post and for continuing to share your thoughts and concerns with me going forward. I welcome a diversity views, even when they differ from my own. This is part of how I learn. For me, continuous learning and ongoing dialogue are key qualities that I’ll bring to the role of mayor.

A City Hall that Works for You

A City Hall that Works

Having a vibrant city with festivals, activities for families downtown, beautiful new buildings, safe and welcoming public spaces, affordable housing, and a strong local economy built on a solid foundation of thriving local businesses is good for everyone. Businesses create jobs while providing a place to get that delicious Americano, a loaf of bread, a good lunch.

During my time on Council, I’ve received countless calls and heard numerous stories from people trying to start small businesses in our city – Fry’s Bread, Wheelie’s Motorcycle Café, Shatterbox Coffee, among many. All of these businesses are run by local people choosing to stay in Victoria. They employ people. And yet, each of them struggled through City Hall’s processes that took far longer than necessary to open, creating an unnecessary and expensive burden for a start-up to shoulder. This is a problem. It prohibits growth.

Similarly, building permits, home renovations, larger scale developments, and organizations building affordable housing are all an important part of the City’s economy. Yet they take unreasonably long, and the steps are often unclear and unpredictable. This leads to frustration. It also tempts people to build without a permit to avoid the red tape at City Hall. People tell me, “Next time, I’m not coming into City Hall. It takes too long and time is money when you’re hiring contractors to do the work.” This is a problem.

Reality Check

For much of the last three years, despite the City having adopted a Customer Service Action Plan, and opening both a Customer Service Centre and a new Planning and Development Centre, the situation hasn’t changed at a fundamental level. City Hall has great staff. Our staff isn’t the problem. The problem is how City Hall is organized – as a series of silos.

In the last eight months, under our new City Manager’s “one city” approach, we have finally begun to make some headway. But the reality is that a City Manager can’t change everything. What’s needed is a mayor with a vision and a plan for running City Hall as an organization that directs its resources towards the goal of making Victoria a prosperous place.

How We Make City Hall Work

To solve these problems takes strong, focused, bold leadership. Run-of-the-mill political leadership isn’t enough, focused so often on re-election rather than best practices. Victoria needs a mayor with a rich and diverse leadership background who understands complexity.

An organization like City Hall is a complex system; all the parts need to be working as a whole focused on the goal of creating local prosperity. If City Hall were run in this way, Wheelie’s, Shatterbox, Fry’s Bread and many other businesses would have been open much sooner, making them more viable from the outset. It would be less stressful to renovate your home. Development projects could be built in a more efficient way, with important decisions being made at the front end of the process. Affordable housing projects would move ahead more quickly. It would be easier for citizens to turn new ideas into action. Victoria would be more prosperous.

Leading for Positive Change

For the past 17 years, I have held a number of leadership positions in Victoria. Nearly 20 years ago, I managed UVic’s Martlet newspaper. I was Board Chair of Fernwood NRG during the revitalisation of the Cornerstone Building and the construction of affordable housing at Park Place. I was Chair of the Bread and Roses Collective, which produced the Victoria Street Newz (now The Megaphone). I helped shape and deliver the Leadership Victoria curriculum. I founded and was Executive Director of Community Micro Lending – an organization that provides mentorship and facilitates loans for small-business start-ups. For the last three years I’ve served as a City Councillor, immersing myself in the issues facing this city, both in Council Chambers and on the ground with citizens.

Working within and across many sectors, I’ve learned how to manage and lead in a way that breaks down silos and creates connections. Victoria needs a mayor who understands complexity and who can bring her diverse leadership experience to bear on the problems at City Hall.

Victoria’s next mayor also needs to understand that a mayor is more than one vote on Council. A mayor is also the CEO of the Corporation of the City of Victoria and has the responsibility to work with her senior management team to help shape how City Hall works and serves. My plan is to transform City Hall into an organization that works as a system, with all staff in all departments working together to serve our residents and businesses.